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The Corps identified the two officers and four enlisted Marines who were killed in last week's helicopter crash in Nepal.

Two pilots, two crew chiefs, a combat photographer and a combat videographer were among the eight people killed when their UH-1Y Venom helicopter crashed eight miles north of Charikot, Nepal, on May 12 during a humanitarian mission.

The six Marines killed in the crash were Capt. Dustin R. Lukasiewicz; Capt. Christopher L. Norgren; Sgt. Ward M. Johnson IV; Sgt. Eric M. Seaman; Cpl. Sara A. Medina; and Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Hug.

Two Nepalese soldiers were also aboard the downed helo. Nepal's army identified them as Tapendra Rawal and Basanta Titara.

The Marines were assisting with relief efforts in Nepal following the deadly April 25 earthquake there.

The pilots and crew chiefs were assigned to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469, based out of Camp Pendleton, California. The combat photographer and combat videographer were assigned to Marine Corps Installations Pacific out of Okinawa, Japan.

Capt. Dustin R. Lukasiewicz, from Nebraska, served as a UH-1Y pilot and aviation safety officer with HMLA-469.

Lukasiewicz received his commissioned on March 28, 2008. He deployed to Afghanistan, with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and to Nepal.

Lukasiewicz was featured in a Marine Corps video about relief efforts in Nepal posted days before the helo accident. He described how they delivered rice, potatoes and tarps to remote areas devastated by the earthquake.

Marine Capt. Dustin Lukasiewiez from Joint Task Force 505 discusses transporting humanitarian aid using U.S. Marine Corps UH-1Y Venom Huey, at Kathmandu, Nepal, May 9. Marine Corps

NBC Nebraska reported that Lukasiewicz was married with a child, and that his wife is expecting another baby.

His awards included an Air Medal with Strike/Flight Numeral 5, a Sea Service Deployment Ribbon and bronze with bronze star for a second award, and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal.

Capt. Christopher L. Norgren, from Kansas, also served as a UH-1Y pilot with HMLA-469.

Norgren received his commission on Aug. 8, 2009. Prior to this deployment to Nepal, Norgren deployed to Afghanistan.

During a press conference Friday evening, Norgren's parents, Terri and Ronald Norgren, described their son as an overachiever and said he was their hero.

Norgren's awards include a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, a Combat Action Ribbon and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with bronze star in lieu of a second award.

Sgt. Ward M. Johnson IV, from Florida, served as a UH-1Y helicopter chief with HMLA-469.

Johnson enlisted in the Marine Corps on March 23, 2009. He deployed to Afghanistan and with the 31st MEU prior to deploying to Nepal.

Johnson's awards included the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, the Air Medal with Strike/Flight Numeral 5, the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal.

Sgt. Eric M. Seaman, from California, also served as a UH-1Y helicopter crew chief with HMLA-469.

Seaman enlisted in the Marine Corps on March 3, 2009. He deployed to Afghanistan and with the 31st MEU prior to deploying to Nepal.

His wife, Samantha Seaman, told ABC 10 that she was overwhelmed by the love and support she received as she waited to hear about her husband's fate.

"I love my husband dearly and we are devastated to hear that he and his brothers are missing," she told the station.

Seaman's awards include the Air Medal with Strike/Flight Numeral 5, the Marine Corps Good Contact Medal with bronze star with a second award and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal.

Cpl. Sara A. Medina, from Illinois, was capturing images of the Marine Corps' relief efforts in Nepal as a combat photographer assigned to Marine Corps Installations Pacific.

Medina enlisted in the Marine Corps on Nov. 29, 2010. Before deploying to Nepal, she had photographed Marines in South Korea, the Philippines, Japan, Australia and the U.S.

Her photo portfolio can be viewed here.

Her awards include the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal and the Korean Defense Service Medal.

Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Hug, from Arizona, was also capturing images of the Marine Corps' relief efforts in Nepal as a combat videographer assigned to Marine Corps Installations Pacific.

Hug enlisted in the Marine Corps on Sept. 4, 2012. Prior to deploying to Nepal, Hug filmed and photographed Marines from South Korea, Thailand, Australia, Japan, Guam and the U.S.

His video and photo portfolio can be viewed here.

Hug's parents told the Arizona Republic that the lance corporal spent his 22nd birthday on May 6 in Nepal. They spoke to him days before the crash when Hug called home on Mother's Day.

Their son was a voracious reader, Hug's father, Jim Hug, told the paper. He kept boxes of books that he typically read two or three times.

"He just devours them," Jim Hug said.

Hug's awards included the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and a Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.

On Sunday, the remains of the Marines and Nepalese soldiers were recovered from the crash site. They were transported to the Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu where they were honorably received, according to a Marine Corps news release.

Lt. Gen. John Wissler, the commander of the joint task force overseeing the U.S. military's relief efforts in Nepal thanked local forces for hiking through hazardous terrain and flying in uncertain weather conditions to find the missing Marines and Nepalese soldiers.

The Nepalese Special Forces stood watch over the Marines on the mountainside at night.

"We honor our fallen comrades through our unselfish support to each other in this time of grief," Wissler said in the release.

He described the fallen troops as "courageous, selfless individuals … whose memories will live on through the lives they touched during this disaster relief operation and in their previous service to their countries."

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