The Corps is still amid plans to overhaul its culture in the wake of the nude photo sharing scandal known as Marines United that rocked the Corps last year.

Military.com reported that this year alone, five out of seven Marine commanders that were sacked were relieved over some equal opportunity concerns or bias, according to comments made by the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn Walters at Tuesday’s Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services meeting.

“It’s because of command climate, how they treat people, how they treat people of different genders,” Walters said, according to Military.com. Walters has been helping lead the charge in shaping Marine Corps culture since the Marines United scandal broke in March 2017.

According to Marine Corps briefing slides, as of September 5, the Corps' task force for investigating harassment and social media misconduct, which formed after the scandal, has helped carry out 101 dispositions; three general courts-martial; six special courts-martial; two summary courts-martial; 16 nonjudicial punishments; eight administrative separations; 29 adverse administrative actions; and 37 no formal adverse action.

Nude images of female Marines and service women were shared on a secretive Facebook page often without the consent of the victims. Many of the images were also followed by harassing and derogatory comments, some of which led to some victims being stalked and preyed upon.

Naval Criminal Investigative Service has scanned nearly 131,000 images over 168 social media platforms, according to the briefing slides.

And the task force has identified a total of 186 persons of interest, which includes 22 non DoD civilians and 163 Marines.

Walters said Tuesday that all courts-martial have resulted in bad-conduct discharges, reduction in rank to private and forfeiture of pay, Military.com reported.