Marine Lt. Gen. Glenn Walters has been nominated to serve as the next assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced Tuesday.

Walters, a career aviator who currently serves as the deputy commandant for Marine Corps Programs and Resources, was also tapped to receive a fourth star. If confirmed by the Senate, Walters will replace Gen. John Paxton Jr. as the Marine Corps' second-highest ranking officer and 33rd assistant commandant.

A Cobra pilot by trade, Walters has served with a host of helicopter and test squadrons. He was the first commanding officer of Marine Operational and Evaluation Squadron 22 and has served as the assistant deputy commandant for Marine Corps Aviation. He was not immediately available for comment on the nomination.

Brig. Gen. Glenn M. Walters, the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) commanding general, prepares to drive a bulldozer on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, April 1. Walters and Sgt. Maj. Henry A. Prutch, the 2nd MAW (Fwd.) sergeant major, visited with MWSS-272 Marines preparing living spaces for 2nd MAW (Fwd.) Marines at Camp Bastion's hangars.
Brig. Gen. Glenn M. Walters, the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) commanding general, prepares to drive a bulldozer on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, April 1. Walters and Sgt. Maj. Henry A. Prutch, the 2nd MAW (Fwd.) sergeant major, visited with MWSS-272 Marines preparing living spaces for 2nd MAW (Fwd.) Marines at Camp Bastion's hangars.

Then-Brig. Gen. Glenn Walters, served as the commander of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) during a 2011 deployment to Afghanistan.

Photo Credit: Cpl. Samantha H. Arrington/Marine Corps

Walters received his second star while deployed to Afghanistan where he led 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward). When the unit was deactivated in March 2012, bringing an end to its role as the aviation combat element in southwestern Afghanistan, Walters said the Marines were able to accomplish its their objectives in large part because they implemented new technology, like iPads, into their missions. 

"Night and day difference in Marjah," he said at the deactivation ceremony, according to a Marine Corps release. "A year ago there were bloody battles and gunfire. When we left, you could go visit the schools, see the girls going to school, walk through the bazaar. Commerce is growing and booming."

Walters was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1979 after graduating from The Citadel, the prestigious military college in South Carolina. He was a platoon commander with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, before attending flight training in Pensacola, Florida.

He was designated a naval aviator in March 1981 and was assigned to Marine Aircraft Group 39, where he trained to fly the AH-1T Cobra helicopter. He was then transferred to Marine Attack Helicopter Squadron 169 where he served as the flight line officer.

The Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. John M. Paxton, Jr., addresses the Brigadier General Select Orientation Course breakfast at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., Aug. 21, 2014. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tia Dufour/Released)
The Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. John M. Paxton, Jr., addresses the Brigadier General Select Orientation Course breakfast at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., Aug. 21, 2014. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tia Dufour/Released)

Paxton

Photo Credit: Cpl. Tia Dufour/Marine Corps

In 1987, Walters deployed in support of Operation Earnest Will, the U.S. military's mission to protect Kuwaiti tankers from Iranian attacks. He has served on land and at sea in the Asia-Pacific region.

His awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, two Meritorious Service Awards and the Air Medal.

Paxton, who currently serves as the second-in-command to Commandant Gen. Robert Neller, will soon retire after 42 years in uniform. A career infantry officer, he commanded grunt units from the platoon through division levels. Paxton previously led Marine Corps Forces Command and Marine Corps Forces Europe. He could not immediately be reached for comment on his next steps.