A Marine first sergeant was sentenced by a military court to two years of confinement for his part in a scheme to steal nearly $1.5 million in razor blades, according to Marine officials.

First Sergeant Lascelles Chambers conspired with three other Department of Defense employees to steal Gillette razor blades and other goods from the Parris Island, South Carolina, recruit depot store and warehouse from January 2017 to June 2018.

Chambers was convicted in a court-martial held aboard Parris Island and later sentenced on June 16 to two years of confinement, reduction to private and a bad conduct discharge, according to 2nd Lt. Alec J. Reddy, a Marine spokesman.

The Marine first sergeant was convicted of larceny, conspiracy and the interstate transportation of stolen goods, Reddy said.

His three other accused cohorts, Orlando Byson, Tommie Harrison Jr. and Sarah Brutus, all pleaded guilty in January at the U.S. District Court in Charleston to one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

The three face up to five years in prison and potentially $250,000 in fines.

Marine Corps Times has reached out to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of South Carolina for an update on their sentencing and has yet to receive a response.

The Parris Island store aboard the South Carolina depot sells razor blades and other items to recruits at a discount price.

According to court documents, Chambers worked with three other defense employees to steal high-end razor blades and other items.

The stolen goods were then sold and the proceeds were split up by Chambers using his Navy Federal Credit Union account.

Harrison and Byson allegedly were able to steal the razor blades at the warehouse and avoid detection by disabling security cameras, according to court documents.

Chambers served as the company first sergeant for Headquarters and Service Battalion at the recruit depot from August 2016 to March 2018.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Shawn Snow is the senior reporter for Marine Corps Times and a Marine Corps veteran.

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