R. Lee Ermey, or “the Gunny" as he’s known from his most famous acting role as Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in the legendary 1987 Marine film, “Full Metal Jacket,” died April 15, 2018, in his home state of California from complications with pneumonia.

The Vietnam vet and staff sergeant was buried on Friday in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

Here are some of the best pictures.

Marines from Marine Barracks Washington line up waiting for the funeral procession in the newly opened section 82 in Arlington National Cemetery, where R. Lee Ermey was laid to rest Jan. 18. (Andrea Scott/Staff)
Marines from Marine Barracks Washington line up waiting for the funeral procession in the newly opened section 82 in Arlington National Cemetery, where R. Lee Ermey was laid to rest Jan. 18. (Andrea Scott/Staff)
Prior Marine Staff. Sgt. R. Lee Ermey lived his life in a way that was “outspoken, rebellious, and creative,
Prior Marine Staff. Sgt. R. Lee Ermey lived his life in a way that was “outspoken, rebellious, and creative," as his obituary states, even until his last breaths at 74 years old. (Andrea Scott/Staff)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington help conduct military funeral honors for honorary gunnery sergeant and Staff. Sgt. Ronald Lee Ermey Jan. 18. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington help conduct military funeral honors for honorary gunnery sergeant and Staff. Sgt. Ronald Lee Ermey Jan. 18. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green, 18th sergeant major of the Marine Corps, helps conduct military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green, 18th sergeant major of the Marine Corps, helps conduct military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
A Marine bugler sounds
A Marine bugler sounds "Taps." (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington fold the U.S. flag during military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington fold the U.S. flag during military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green (left), 18th sergeant major of the Marine Corps, presents the U.S. flag to Marianila Ermey during the funeral for her husband of 38 years, R. Lee Ermey. Ermey also left behind six children, 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green (left), 18th sergeant major of the Marine Corps, presents the U.S. flag to Marianila Ermey during the funeral for her husband of 38 years, R. Lee Ermey. Ermey also left behind six children, 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
A member of the Young Marines attends the funeral. Ermey's passion for the troops was apparent in his avid philanthropic work with organizations like Young Marines, Fisher House and Toys for Tots. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
A member of the Young Marines attends the funeral. Ermey's passion for the troops was apparent in his avid philanthropic work with organizations like Young Marines, Fisher House and Toys for Tots. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington march off during military funeral honors. Ermey served for 11 years in the Marine Corps, including 14 months in Vietnam, before being medically discharged in 1972. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Marines from the Marine Barracks Washington march off during military funeral honors. Ermey served for 11 years in the Marine Corps, including 14 months in Vietnam, before being medically discharged in 1972. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
The firing party from the Marine Barracks Washington march off following the conclusion of military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
The firing party from the Marine Barracks Washington march off following the conclusion of military funeral honors. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Clint (left) and Betty (right), children of R. Lee Ermey, speak at the conclusion of his funeral. Ermey had decided to buy a unicycle at age 60 and had tried to learn how to ride, they told family and friends as they shared other memories of their father. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)
Clint (left) and Betty (right), children of R. Lee Ermey, speak at the conclusion of his funeral. Ermey had decided to buy a unicycle at age 60 and had tried to learn how to ride, they told family and friends as they shared other memories of their father. (Elizabeth Fraser/Army)